Higher SAT and ACT scores can not only help you get into college; they can also help you pay for it.  You don’t need to be in the 99th percentile either, but you should check whether your top choices give an edge to one test over the other.  Partnering with Edmit, a college price and value comparison service, we found some schools that do.

Test scores matter for selective schools.  Everyone knows that.  Students and parents can get obsessed with breaking 1450 on the SAT or 32 on the ACT, but test scores are not used solely to determine who gets into a school.  They are also used as the basis for scholarships at hundreds of schools.  And, often enough, schools are not looking for 99th percentile scores to award money.  Students can lower their tuition with ACT scores in the low 20s and SAT scores in the 1100s.  Could one test give you an advantage over the other?

Our partner on this project, Edmit, a new service that lets students compare the price and value of colleges, looked at the flagship public universities in all 50 states plus a few scholarship programs and other prominent public schools.  (We’ll expand to a larger set of schools in the future.)  The aim was, first, to identify how many of these schools award merit aid using cutoff ACT and SAT scores and, then, to compare those cut scores to see whether students might find an advantage in applying with one score over the other. Could it be better to submit one score rather than the other?

Before we answer that question, let’s first address a more fundamental question:  could it be better to take one test rather than the other?  Are there “SAT people” and “ACT people”?  There are people in the test prep industry who like to claim so, but we’re not sure.

We think the decision-making around what test to take should be based on evidence rather than a handful of anecdotes or small samples. The trouble is that there has not been a lot of research comparing how students who take both the ACT and SAT perform.  One study showed a very high correlation between performance on the two exams, but it is almost two decades old. The SAT has undergone two redesigns during that period and most test prep experts agree that the ACT has grown more difficult.

Comparing performances between the tests has grown more challenging for the ordinary person because, with the SAT’s latest redesign, the scaling of the test changed. Roughly speaking, the scores on the redesigned SAT rose about 30 points higher per section.  A 700 on the Math section of the old exam would be more like a 730 on the new SAT; a  500 on the new test would have been a 460 on the old.   What that meant was that the old concordance table that the College Board and ACT developed together could no longer be used by schools to compare students taking different tests or hoping to earn scholarships.  College Board developed its own SAT-to-ACT concordance for the redesigned SAT.  ACT objected at being left out of the process and contested the legitimacy of the concordance.  The two companies are collaborating on a new concordance, but for now colleges are left with this one table and have to trust they can use it to compare scores. The new concordance should be released in the summer of 2018.

Edmit’s findings show that almost all schools using cut scores used the concordance.  Their ACT cutoff scores line up with their equivalents in almost all cases. The alignment cannot be perfect, however, because each single ACT composite score corresponds to a score range on the SAT.  For example, a 21 on the ACT corresponds to a 1060-1090 on the SAT total score; a 32 corresponds to a 1450-1470.

As a result, colleges using cutoff scores–a practice not endorsed by ACT or the College Board–need to decide where they will align ACT scores to the SAT range.  The majority of schools in the table below aligned their ACT score with the lowest aligning SAT score.  We believe this is the safest practice, given that ACT composite scores are themselves something of a range because they are rounded averages.  For instance, if a student gets test section scores of 24-22-22-22, his average score would be a 22.5, which would round up to a 23.   When a school aligns its ACT cut score with the highest SAT score in the range, it could in fact be putting students who take the ACT at an advantage.

Maine is one of those states that uses the high SAT cut score.  Leslie Trundy, a school counselor at Morse High School in Bath, Maine, looked at her students’ merit aid awards and found that the ACT was getting better results for her students.  She wrote in an email:

In fall 2016, I attended a University of Maine workshop where they unveiled their emphasis on test scores in the merit aid awarding. . . . I began to really look at merit aid when a student had U Maine on their list as part of my advising around whether to take the SAT again or take the ACT, and I began to look at the data set I already had. We have been one of few ACT test centers in Maine and as a service to my coworkers, I have maintained a database with SAT compared to ACT test scores. . . . The database was available to add the merit aid formula to [in order to make the] comparison.

Trundy found that “overwhelmingly, students from Morse High School had a higher potential merit aid award through their ACT score.” The largest area of aid was at the entry-level, $2,000/year award. There were Sstudents whose SAT scores did not meet the threshold of 1120 but met the 22 composite threshold on the ACT. “One student, ranked near the top of the class, would have received no merit aid with her SAT score,” Trundy wrote, “but she won an offer of $6,000/year with her ACT score.”

Trundy credits her school’s strong STEM curriculum with these outcomes, but the ACT advantage at her school may have as much to do with an ACT-leaning cut score at the University of Maine. Note that Trundy was comparing ACT scores to scores for the pre-redesign SAT.  It will be important to see whether this pattern still holds for the redesigned exam.

At some schools, where their cut scores do not line up with the concordance, the advantages for one test over the other could be even larger.  There can be little doubt at two institutions, the University of Florida and the University of Hawaii, that students submitting an SAT score have a clear, strong, and unfair advantage over students submitting only an ACT score.  Our Director of National Outreach, James Murphy, and Director of Equity and Access, Akil Bello, analyzed Edmit’s findings and discovered that the schools were offering merit aid based on the old SAT-ACT concordance.

In Florida, the Department of Education sponsors two scholarships that use cut scores.  Over the past 20 years, the Bright Futures scholarship program has contributed more than $5 billion to some 750,000 students, using money from the Florida Lottery. Florida Medallion scholars must meet a range of requirements, including a 26 on the ACT or an 1170 on the SAT, in order to win up to $77/credit hour for tuition at the University of Florida.  Florida Academic Scholars need a 29 on the ACT or a 1290 on the SAT in order to win full tuition at the University of Florida plus a small stipend each semester.  These cut scores were set in 2011 and led to complaints that they were too high.

The problem is that the SAT numbers were not revised in 2016, when the SAT was redesigned.  The 26 Composite score students need on the ACT to be Medallion Scholars equates with a 1240 on the SAT, not an 1170.  As a result, it’s like getting a 70-point boost on the SAT. Academic scholars need a 29 on the ACT, which equates with a 1350, not a 1290, so SAT students are getting a 60-point boost.  These are not small differences.  They need to be corrected.

Neither are the gaps small at the University of Hawaii, where the $10,000 Chancellor’s Scholarship gives SAT takers an 80-point advantage and the full-tuition Regents’ Scholarship, which includes a stipend, gives SAT takers a 70-point advantage.

We have reached out to both institutions to alert them to these problems.

There are two main lessons to be taken from this analysis.  First, students should know that test scores are not only about gaining admission.  They also play a role in merit aid.  Second, it could be to students’ benefit to take both the SAT and the ACT in order to ensure that they are able to take advantage of any gaps that might exist in the cut scores many schools use to award merit aid.

FINDINGS
  1. 37 out of 58 flagship/prominent schools use ACT/SAT cut scores.
  2. There are more than 100 different scholarships tied to cut scores at those 33 schools.
  3. Scholarships range from $750 to full tuition.
  4. The lowest cut score is at the University of Alaska (18 ACT/950 SAT).
  5. There are lots of scholarships for scores in the 20s and 1100s and 1200s.
  6. There are 6 scholarship programs that do not use the College Board concordance correctly.

The table below includes schools that use the SAT and ACT as components in determining who will receive merit aid as well as the amount of aid the schools will provide in 2017-18. The test scores are almost always only one component considered. In the last column we identify whether schools provide an advantage to one test.

If a school equates the ACT score with the lowest SAT score on the concordance, we identify the advantage as EVEN.  If the ACT corresponds to the highest SAT score, we identify the advantage as ACT.  If a school does not use the concordance to equate scores, we identify it as either STRONG ACT or STRONG SAT or, if the gap between the concordance and the SAT cut score is larger than 50 points, as EXTREME ACT or EXTREME SAT.

Although we confirmed all the information in the table, it is subject to change, so students should reconfirm all the information with the schools to which they are applying.

Institution Scholarship ACT SAT Annual  Award ($)

 

Test Advantage
Auburn University University 28 1310 4,000 EVEN
Auburn University Founders 30 1390 8,000 EVEN
Auburn University Presidential 33 1490 Tuition EVEN
Alfred State (SUNY) All-American Scholarship 24 1220 Board EXTREME ACT
Alfred State (SUNY) Presidential Scholarship 26 1270 Room ACT
Alfred State (SUNY) Excellence in Education 28 1310 Tuition, Room, and Board EVEN
University of Montana Presidential Leadership 27 1270 Tuition and Stipend STRONG SAT
Clemson University Trustee Scholarship 27 1270 1,000 EVEN
Clemson University Out of State Tuition Scholarship 29 1360 7,500+ ACT
Clemson University Presidential Scholarship 32 1450 1,500 EVEN
Indiana University-Bloomington “Direct Admission” criteria – prereq for several scholarships 28 1320 various ACT
Iowa State Cardinal Leadership Scholar Award (CLSA) 25 1200 1,000 EVEN
Iowa State Cardinal Leadership Scholar Award (CLSA) 27 1280 2,500 EVEN
Louisiana State Louisiana Tiger Legacy Scholarship – Superior 26 1240 750 EVEN
Louisiana State Louisiana Tiger Legacy Scholarship – Excellence 28 1310 1,000 EVEN
Louisiana State Stamps Scholarship 33 1490 32,000 EVEN
Louisiana State LSU Alumni Association’s Global Leaders Award 33  1490 2,000 stipend EVEN
Louisiana State Texas Tigers Scholarship 26 1240 3,335 EVEN
Louisiana State Tiger Nation Scholarship 26 1240 3,335 EVEN
Louisiana State Tiger Excellence Scholars Award 28 1310 1,500 EVEN
University of Oregon Stamps 28 1300 Tuition, Room, and Board STRONG SAT
University of Oregon Presidential 28 1300 9,000 STRONG SAT
University of Oregon Summit 26 1260 6,000 ACT
University of Oregon Apex 25 1220 3,000 ACT
Louisiana State Academic Scholars Award 30 1390 2,000 EVEN
Louisiana State President’s Alumni Scholars Award 33 1490 32,000 EVEN
Louisiana State Flagship Scholars Award 33 1490 3,500 EVEN
Ohio State University Trustees 30 1350 1,500 STRONG SAT
Ohio State University National Buckeye Scholarship 29 1350 12,500 EVEN
Ohio State University Maximus 33 1450 4,000 STRONG SAT
Ohio State University Eminence Fellows 34 1520 Full tuition EVEN
Ohio State University Provost 31 1390 2,500 STRONG SAT
Oregon State Finley Academic Excellence Scholarship for new resident freshmen 27 1300 3,000 ACT
Oregon State Finley Academic Excellence Scholarship for new resident freshmen 27 1300 6,000 ACT
Oregon State Presidential Scholarship 29 1360 10,000 ACT
State of Florida Florida Medallion Scholars 26 1170 77/credit hour EXTREME SAT
State of Florida Florida Academic Scholars 29 1290  Full tuition EXTREME SAT
Texas A&M Academic Scholarships 30 1360 1,500+ STRONG SAT
University of Alabama Presidential Elite Scholar 36 1600 Full tuition + stipends EVEN
University of Alabama Crimson Achievement Scholar 25 1200 2,000 EVEN
University of Alabama UA Legends 26 1240 2,500 EVEN
University of Alabama Capstone Scholar 27 1280 4,000+ EVEN
University of Alabama Collegiate Scholar 28-29 1310 – 1380 5,000+ EVEN
University of Alabama Foundation in Excellence Scholar 30-31 1390 – 1440 8,000+ EVEN
University of Alabama Presidential Scholar 32-36 1450 – 1600 10,470+ EVEN
University of Tennessee-Knoxville HOPE (Lottery) Scholarship 21 1060 1,750 EVEN
University of Tennessee-Knoxville Chancellor’s Scholarship 31 1420 Various EVEN
University of Tennessee-Knoxville Volunteer Scholarship 28–29 1310 – 1380 3,000+ EVEN
University of Tennessee-Knoxville Volunteer Scholarship 30–33 1390 – 1510 5,000+ EVEN
University of Tennessee-Knoxville Volunteer Scholarship 34–36 1520 – 1600 8,000+ EVEN
University of Alaska Ad Summum 18 950 Variable ACT
University of Alaska Academic Achievement 24 1200 2,500 STRONG ACT
University of Alaska Chancellor’s 27 1300 4,000 ACT
University of Alaska Cornerstone 27/30 1300 2,500 ACT
University of Alaska Nanook Gold 30 1410 Full tuition ACT
University of Alaska Cornerstone Gold 30 1410 5,000 ACT
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 22 – 23 1100 – 1150 6,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 22 – 23 1100 – 1150 5,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 22 – 23 1100 – 1150 5,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 22 – 23 1100 – 1150 4,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 22 – 23 1100 – 1150 3,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 24 – 25 1160 – 1230 8,500 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 24 – 25 1160 – 1230 6,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 24 – 25 1160 – 1230 6,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 24 – 25 1160 – 1230 4,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 24 – 25 1160 – 1230 3,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 26 – 27 1240 – 1300 8,500 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 26 – 27 1240 – 1300 8,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 26 – 27 1240 – 1300 6,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 26 – 27 1240 – 1300 6,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 26 – 27 1240 – 1300 4,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 28 – 29 1310 – 1380 10,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 28 – 29 1310 – 1380 9,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 28 – 29 1310 – 1380 8,500 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 28 – 29 1310 – 1380 8,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 28 – 29 1310 – 1380 6,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 30 – 31 1390 – 1440 11,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 30 – 31 1390 – 1440 10,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 30 – 31 1390 – 1440 10,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 30 – 31 1390 – 1440 9,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 30 – 31 1390 – 1440 7,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 32 – 36 1450 – 1600 12,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 32 – 36 1450 – 1600 12,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 32 – 36 1450 – 1600 10,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 32 – 36 1450 – 1600 9,000 EVEN
University of Arizona Wildcat Excellence Tuition Award 32 – 36 1450 – 1600 8,000 EVEN
University of Arkansas New Arkansan Non-Resident Tuition Award Scholarship 24 1160 10,600-   13,700 EVEN
University of Arkansas Extended States New Arkansan NRTA 26 1240 7,600 –    12,200 EVEN
University of Arkansas Extended States New Arkansan NRTA 28 1310 7,600 –    12,200 EVEN
University of Arkansas New Arkansan Non-Resident Tuition Award Scholarship 28 1310 10,600-    13,700 EVEN
University of Arkansas New Arkansan Non-Resident Tuition Award Scholarship 30 1390 10,600-   13,700 EVEN
University of Arkansas New Arkansan Non-Resident Tuition Award Scholarship 24 – 25 1160 – 1230 10,600-   13,700 EVEN
University of Colorado President James H. Baker Award 28 1310 2500 EVEN
University of Colorado President James H. Baker Award 30 1370 2500 STRONG SAT
University of Colorado President Horace M. Hale Award 31 1410 3500 STRONG SAT
University of Colorado President Joseph A. Sewall Award 33 1480 5000 STRONG SAT
University of Delaware UD Provost Scholarship 29 1350 1000 EVEN
University of Delaware UD Presidential Scholarship 30 1400 2,500-       3,500 ACT
University of Delaware UD Trustee Scholarship 33 1500 4,000-       6,000 EVEN
University of Georgia Foundation Fellowship 32 1470 19,552+ ACT
University of Georgia Bernard Ramsey Honors Scholarship 32 1470 15,552 ACT
University of Hawaii CHANCELLOR’S 27 1200 10,000 EXTREME SAT
University of Hawaii MĀNOA EXCELLENCE 27 1200 ~22,032 EXTREME SAT
University of Hawaii REGENTS 29 1300 Full tuition + stipends EXTREME SAT
University of Iowa National Scholars Award 26 1240 7,000 EVEN
University of Iowa Old Gold Scholarship 30 1390 5,000 (in-state) 10,000 (out) EVEN
University of Iowa Presidential Scholarship 33 1490 18,500 EVEN
University of Iowa Iowa Flagship Award 33 1490 8,500 EVEN
University of Iowa Iowa Scholars Award 27-30 1280 – 1390 2,500 EVEN
University of Kansas Jayhawk 24 1160 1,000 EVEN
University of Kansas Rock Chalk 25 1200 1,000 EVEN
University of Kansas Crimson & Blue 28 1310 2,000 EVEN
University of Kansas Traditions 31 1420 4,000 EVEN
University of Kansas Chancellor 32 1450 5,000 EVEN
University of Kentucky Bluegrass Spirit 25 1200 8,000+ EVEN
University of Kentucky Provost 26 1240 2,500+ EVEN
University of Kentucky Presidential 31 1420 Full Out-of-State Tuition EVEN
University of Kentucky Presidential 31 1420 Full In-State Tuition EVEN
University of Kentucky KY Governor’s Scholar Presidential 31 1420 Full In-State Tuition EVEN
University of Kentucky Otis A. Singletary 33 1490 Full 4-year Out-of-State Tuition + $10,000 Housing Stipend ( EVEN
University of Kentucky Otis A. Singletary 33 1490 Full 4-year In-State Tuition + $10,000 Housing Stipend EVEN
University of Maine Black Bear Scholarship 22 1120 2,000 ACT
University of Maine Flagship Match 22 – 23 1120 Depends on state residency ACT
University of Maine Dean’s Scholarship 26 1270 4,000 ACT
University of Maine Flagship Scholarship 28 1340 6,000 ACT
University of Maine Presidential Scholarship 32 1450 8,000 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 25 1200 1,500 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 26 1240 1,900 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 27 1280 2,250 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 28 1310 3,000 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 29 1350 3,500 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 30 1390 4,500 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 31 1420 5,500 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 32 1450 7,500 EVEN
University of Mississippi Academic Excellence 33+ 1490+ 8,190 EVEN
University of Missouri Excellence award 27 1280 2,000 EVEN
University of Missouri Curators Scholars 28 1310 4,500 EVEN
University of Missouri Chancellor’s Award 31 1420 6,500 EVEN
University of Missouri Mizzou Scholars 33 1490 10,000 EVEN
University of Missouri Missouri Higher Education Academic Scholarships (Bright Flight ) 31 1600 3,000 EXTREME ACT
University of Nevada Rebel Challenge Dean’s Award 23 1130 7,000 EVEN
University of Nevada Rebel Challenge President’s Award 23 1130 11,000 EVEN
University of Nevada Rebel Challenge Provost’s Award 23 1130 9,000 EVEN
University of Nevada Western Undergraduate Exchange 24 1160 11,000 EVEN
University of Nevada Rebel Scholarship 23-26 1130 – 1240 1,800 EVEN
University of Nevada Rebel Scholarship 25-26 1200 – 1240 1,800 EVEN
University of Nevada UNLV Excellence Scholarship 27-29 1280 – 1350 3,750 EVEN
University of Nevada Rebel Scholarship 27-36 1280 – 1600 1,800 EVEN
University of Nevada Provost’s Scholarship 30-36 1390 – 1600 5,250 EVEN
University of Nevada UNLV Excellence Scholarship 30-36 1390 – 1600 3,750 EVEN
University of New Hampshire Director’s Scholarship 25 1200 1,000+ EVEN
University of New Hampshire Dean’s Scholarship 26 1260 1,500+ ACT
University of New Hampshire Presidential Scholarship 29 1390 5,000+ STRONG ACT
University of New Mexico Bridge to Success 23 1130 1,500 EVEN
University of New Mexico Presidential Scholarship 25 1200 8,934 EVEN
University of New Mexico UNM Scholars 26 1240 6,713 EVEN
University of New Mexico Woodward Scholars 29 1350 8,056 EVEN
University of New Mexico Regents 31 1420 18,868 EVEN
University of North Dakota new freshmen scholarships 22-24 1100 – 1190 1,000 EVEN
University of North Dakota new freshmen scholarships 25+ 1200+ 1,500 EVEN
University of North Dakota new freshmen scholarships 29-31 1350 – 1440 2,500 EVEN
University of North Dakota new freshmen scholarships 32+ 1450+ 3,000 EVEN
University of Oklahoma Award of Excellence 31 1420 3,000 EVEN
University of Oklahoma Academic Achievements 26-27 1240 – 1300 1,000 EVEN
University of Oklahoma University Scholarship 28 1310 – 1340 1,500 EVEN
University of Oklahoma Distinguished Scholar 29-30 1350 – 1410 2,500 EVEN
University of Rhode Island Merit scholarships 23 1130 Various EVEN
University of Utah Freshman Academic Achievement Award for Non-Residents 26-27 1240 – 1300 6,000 EVEN
University of Utah Freshman Academic Achievement Award for Non-Residents 28-29 1310 – 1380 8,000 EVEN
University of Utah Freshman Academic Achievement Award for Non-Residents 30-32 1390 – 1480 10,000 EVEN
University of Utah Freshman Academic Achievement Award for Non-Residents 33-36 1490 – 1600 12,000 EVEN
University of Vermont Justin Morrill Scholarship 24 1160 2,000 EVEN
University of Vermont Patrick Family Scholarship 26 1260 4,000+ ACT
University of Vermont Vermont Scholars 26 1260 6,000+ ACT
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 36 1600 9,675 EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 21 1060 3,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 22 1100 3,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 23 1130 $3000 and up EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 24 1160 3,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 25 1200 3,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 26 1240 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 27 1280 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 28 1310 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 29 1350 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 30 1390 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 31 1420 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 32 1450 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 33 1490 6,000+ EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 34 1520 9,675 EVEN
University of Wyoming Non-resident scholarships 35 1560 9,675 EVEN
West Virginia University Foundation Scholarship 30 1400 Full cost of attendance + stipend ACT
West Virginia University G. Belmont Berry Scholarship 20-21 1030- 1100 1,500 ACT
West Virginia University Scholarship of Distinction Level 4 22 1110 1,500 ACT
West Virginia University Scholarship of Distinction Level 3 24 1180 2,500 ACT
West Virginia University Scholarship of Distinction Level 2 26 1260 3,000 ACT
West Virginia University Bucklew Scholarship 30 1400 8,000+ ACT
West Virginia University Scholarship of Distinction Level 1 30 1400 4,000 ACT

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